Television and Lack of Physical Activity is Kryptonite to Sperm

The British Journal of Sports Medicine finds watching a lot of television (20h/week or more) is associated with lowered sperm concentrations and nearly half of the group with the highest count – those that watched no television.

Those exercising ≥15 h/week also had the highest sperm concentration and the lowest concentration of sperm was the group that did the least amount of exercise (<5h/week)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23380634

Physical activity and television watching in relation to semen quality in young men.

BACKGROUND:

Semen quality appears to have declined over the past decades but reasons for this decline are unresolved. The concurrent increase in sedentary behaviour may be a contributing factor. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship of physical activity and television (TV) watching with sperm parameters in a population of young, healthy men.

METHODS:

Men aged 18-22 years (n=189) from the Rochester Young Men’s Study (2009-2010) participated in this analysis. Physical activity (h/week of moderate and vigorous exercise) and TV watching (h/week of TV, video or DVD watching) over the past 3 months were assessed via questionnaire. Semen quality was assessed by sperm concentration, motility, morphology and total sperm count.

RESULTS:

Sperm concentration and total sperm count were directly related to physical activity after multivariable adjustment (p-trend=0.01 and 0.04); men in the highest quartile of moderate-to-vigorous activity (≥15 h/week) had 73% (95% CI 15% to 160%) higher sperm concentration than men in the lowest quartile (<5 h/week). TV watching was inversely associated with sperm concentration and total sperm count in multivariable analyses (p-trend=0.05 and 0.06); men in the highest quartile of TV watching (>20 h/week) had 44% (95% CI 15 to 63%) lower sperm concentration than men in the lowest quartile (0 h/week). These measures of physical and leisure time activities were not significantly associated with sperm motility or morphology.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this population of healthy men, higher moderate-to-vigorous activity and less TV watching were significantly associated with higher total sperm count and sperm concentration.

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